3 Eyguieres Gate

Visitors wishing to walk to the Fontaine Valley can take the cobbled Chemin de la Calade and go through the Eyguières Gate (or Watergate) which, until 1866, was the only entrance to the village. Rebuilt by Constable de Montmorency, the gate was raised in the 18th century by the Prince of Monaco who had been granted the Barony of Les Baux in 1643. The coat-of-arms of the House of Grimaldi can still be seen above the gate, in a cartouche decorated with Baroque foliage. The gate still has its system of defence and its overhanging battlements pierced with slit windows. A second, larger guardroom was built to the north of the Eyguières Gate; it now houses the Santons Museum.
 
 
HOUSE OF GRIMALDI
From 1643 to 1790, when the title had been raised to that of a Marquisate, the town became a Grimaldi possession and the family still retains this honorary title in its armorial.
Coat-of-arms of the House of Grimaldi: Fusily argent and gules shield, surrounded by the Collar of the Order of St. Charles placed on a red cloak lined with ermine and surmounted by the princely crown.
Supporters: two Friars Minor, hairy, bearded and wearing shoes, each holding a raised sword and standing on a scroll charged with the motto "Deo Juvante" (With God's Help).

Visitors wishing to walk to the Fontaine Valley can take the cobbled Chemin de la Calade and go through the Eyguières Gate (or Watergate) which, until 1866, was the only entrance to the village. Rebuilt by Constable de Montmorency, the gate was raised in the 18th century by the Prince of Monaco who had been granted the Barony of Les Baux in 1643. The coat-of-arms of the House of Grimaldi can still be seen above the gate, in a cartouche decorated with Baroque foliage. The gate still has its system of defence and its overhanging battlements pierced with slit windows. A second, larger guardroom was built to the north of the Eyguières Gate; it now houses the Santons Museum.

 

House of Grimaldi

From 1643 to 1790, when the title had been raised to that of a Marquisate, the town became a Grimaldi possession and the family still retains this honorary title in its armorial.
Coat-of-arms of the House of Grimaldi: Fusily argent and gules shield, surrounded by the Collar of the Order of St. Charles placed on a red cloak lined with ermine and surmounted by the princely crown.
Supporters: two Friars Minor, hairy, bearded and wearing shoes, each holding a raised sword and standing on a scroll charged with the motto "Deo Juvante" (With God's Help).